The qualitative research team

The PROMPPT qualitative research team is formed of four researchers. Members of the team will support the process evaluation of the PROMPPT Feasibility Study and conduct interviews with yourselves, a GP at your practice, and a subset of patients.

We would like to take this opportunity to introduce you to the qualitative team:

Dr Nicola Cornwall

Lecturer in Applied Health Research

Keele University

Biography

I am an applied health researcher with a background in mixed methods research working with people with long-term health conditions, including Stroke and Parkinson’s disease to help improve their health and quality of life. I started at Keele University when I studied for my undergraduate degree in Human Biology and Psychology followed by a Master’s degree in Clinical Psychological Research. After which I joined Bradford Institute for Health Research working on numerous research projects and also undertook my PhD in Health Sciences (University of Leeds). I returned to Keele in 2018 and joined the PROMPPT study team in March 2019.

I am excited to be a part of the research team working on the PROMPPT study to improve outcomes for people living with persistent pain. I will be mainly working on the qualitative aspects of the research programme including the interviews with people with pain, GPs and clinical pharmacists that will help to design the clinical pharmacist review consultation (PROMPPT). I am also one of the faces behind @KeelePain our social media accounts for both Twitter and Facebook.

Prof Clare Jinks

Professor of Health Research

Keele University

Biography

I am a social scientist and applied health researcher with an interest in primary care research aimed at improving the health of people with musculoskeletal conditions and multimorbidity. My research aims to investigate the burden of musculoskeletal conditions, experiences of pain and health care, and development and evaluation of complex interventions to optimise primary care management. I have particular expertise in mixed methods, process evaluation, and using qualitative research alongside randomised controlled trials.  As part of the PROMPPT team I am helping to find out what factors might help or hinder how PROMPPT is delivered, and how we can use this information to optimise the PROMPPT intervention and training that we can offer to clinical pharmacists. .

Dr Libby Laing

Research Fellow

University of Nottingham

Biography

Following a career in adult nursing, I have completed an undergraduate degree in Psychology, a Masters degree in Health Psychology and a PhD in primary care related health behaviour change. Since 2013, alongside studying, I have also been involved in various health care related projects based at the University of Nottingham. These projects have mainly aimed to promote wellbeing and improve quality of life for patients living with a long-term health condition such as chronic kidney disease and cognitive impairment following stroke.

In my current role as a Research Fellow, I have been working on a longitudinal evaluation of a primary care prescribing safety intervention (PINCER). This has involved conducting interviews and focus groups with GPs, pharmacists and patients in order to gather their experiences and opinions on different aspects of the intervention. Whilst continuing to work in my current role, I will also be helping with the qualitative components of the PROMPPT study which I am really looking forward to.


 

 

Dr Charlotte Woodcock

Lecturer in Applied Health Research

Keele University

Biography

I have studied, researched and consulted in the field of psychology for over 10 years working with people to pursue personal goals whilst enhancing overall health and wellbeing. I am thrilled to be part of the PROMPPT study team and have this opportunity to work with people living with persistent pain on such an important project.  I have been involved with our online discussion forum where people with long-term pain discussed their experiences and share their views of living with persistent pain, experiences of opioids and what a pain review might look like. These patient voices have contributed to the development of the PROMPPT review and this associated training package.